Cosmopolitan Toastmasters

Somewhat Better Speaking, Listening, Thinking and Eating

                                          The Cosmo-Agenda

 

 

  Time       Orders of the Day (agenda)

Direct Links:  Go to Business Meeting

       Go to Robert's Rules of Order 

 

  6:00        Call to Order

                  Opening Thought

                  Guest Introductions

  6:04        Grammarian Report

                  Parliamentarian Report

  6:07        Roll Call

                  Previous Meeting Minutes                         

                  Committee Reports

  6:16        Unfinished Business

  6:22        New Business

  6:30        Table-Topics Session

  6:53               Recess

 

  7:00        Speaking Program

  7:45        Evaluations

  8:20       Closing Remarks

  8:25        Adjourn

  8:30        Post-Toasties at the Bar

 

                   The Agenda      

 The Agenda sets the meeting time(s) and activities that the club will follow.  It is called the "Orders-of-the-Day".  The Chair should make every effort to conform to the agenda including beginning and ending on time.

 When the agenda is not being followed, a motion may be made called, "Orders-of-the-Day" which insists that we get back to the agenda.  It requires only a 1/3 vote to pass.

 The Agenda may be bypassed by  calling for "Suspension of the Rules".  This means you want to bypass the Agenda for a period of time or for a purpose.  It requies 2/3 to pass.  In short, the AGENDA is powerful in defining what goes on in a meeting and when. 

 It is each members responsibility to limit remarks to help keep us on the "agenda track."

      

 

                                The Cosmo-Business Meeting

 

What is the Cosmopolitan Business Meeting about?

 

One Confused Pig?

To a first-time visitor a Cosmopolitan 515 business meeting can be somewhat intimidating. 

(I thought I had mistakenly stumbled into the House of Commons.)  Then, as things move along, one comes to realize that all this heated debating is possibly about some inane and inconsequential item of business.......presented by: Tom "Guy" Renick;  Past President

 

What is going on, and what is its purpose?

 

The business meeting has a number of purposes.  On some rare occasions there is actually some official business of the club that needs to be addressed. There is a “Walter Mitty” aspect to the business meeting in that it gives “wannabe statesmen” the opportunity to engage in bombastic debate as though they were Daniel Webster, John C. Calhoun or some other historic leader.  The debate often has a gamesmanship aspect to it as members try to outwit the other debaters and befuddle the chairman.  But the most important reason for the business meeting is that it gives members the opportunity to learn and practice Roberts’ Rules of Order.

 

Roberts’ Rules of Order are a set of rules and procedures by which almost all official meetings of government and business in the U.S. are conducted. They are followed in some form by city councils, school boards, political parties, clubs and organizations, and the like.  The rules are intended to assure that the business of the organization is discussed and conducted in a fair and orderly fashion.  Knowing and understanding these rules will make you more comfortable in such situations, and more importantly, gives you an advantage over those less knowledgeable in leading and influencing the workings of the organization.

 

It is important to remember that in a Cosmopolitan 515 business meeting the process is almost always more important than the product.  Benefit is derived from it only by participating.  Don’t hesitate to participate, add your two cents worth to the debate or make a motion.

To aid members during the business meeting, the basics of Roberts’ Rules of Order are summarized in the upper right hand corner of the placemat. Those rules are included here as well.  A motion that may be of considerable interest to newcomers is the “Point of Parliamentary Inquiry”.  If you get confused about what is going on in the meeting, stand up and say, "Mr. Chairman, I rise to a point of parliamentary inquiry."  The Chairman should then respond with something like: "State your inquiry."  Then ask your question.  Also, feel free to quiz the Club Parliamentarian following his report.

 

Toward the end of the business meeting, you will often hear, "Orders of the Day" being called.  This is actually a motion demanding that we adhere to the printed agenda on your placemat.  It only needs 1/3 to pass.

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                                        Roberts Rules of Order

Privileged Motions:

Interrupt?

Second?

Debatable?

Amend?

Pass?

Reconsider?

Set Time – Continue session

No

Yes

No

Yes

½ +

Yes

Adjourn

No

Yes

No

No

½+

No

Recess

No

Yes

No (3)

Yes

½

No

Questions of Privilege

Yes

No

No

No

½

No

Orders of the Day

Yes (1)

No

No

No

1/3 

No

Subsidiary Motions:

Interrupt?

Second?

Debatable?

Amend?

Pass?

Reconsider?

Table

No

Yes

No

No

½+

No

Previous Question (close Debate)

No

Yes

No

No

2/3

Yes

Limit or Extend Debate

No

Yes

No

Yes

2/3

Yes

Postpone to a Fixed Time

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

½+

Yes

Commit (to Committee)

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

½+

Yes

Amend

No

Yes

Yes

Once

½+

Yes

Postpone Indefinitely

No

Yes

Yes

No

½+

Yes, if pass

    Main Motion (General)

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

½

Yes

Bring Back Motions:

Interrupt?

Second?

Debatable?

Amend?

Pass?

Reconsider?

Reconsider (5)

No

Yes

Yes (4)

No

½+

No

Rescind

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

2/3

Yes, if fail

Take from Table

No

Yes

No

No

½

No

Incidental Motions:

Interrupt?

Second?

Debatable?

Amend?

Pass?

Reconsider?

Point of Order (if ruling by club)

Yes

No

No

No

½

no

Parliamentary Inquiry

Yes

No

No

No

None

No

Division of the House

Yes

No

No

No

----

No

Appeal Ruling of the Chair

Yes

Yes

Yes (2)

No

½+

Yes

Objection (to the Motion)

Yes

No

No

No

2/3

Yes

Suspend Rules

No

Yes

No

No

2/3

No

 Notes:    

1. yes, if motion being made and before stated by chair

2. no, if concerning agenda          

3. yes, if not used as a privileged motion.

4. yes, when applied to debatable motion

5. only person voting with the majority may move to reconsider

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